These 127 Women Who Ditched Dyeing Their Hair Look So Good, They May Convince You To Do The Same (New Pics)

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Gray hair is nothing to be ashamed of. In fact, pure silver looks utterly fantastic. So fantastic that you might want to flaunt it in front of the world. And that’s what the Grombre community is all about at its core—celebrating gray, silver, and white hair, as well as helping women find confidence in their natural look.

Liberation and empowerment is the name of the game and below you’ll find women showing off their fabulous natural hairstyles, as featured by Grombre. Scroll down, upvote the photos that you liked the most, and be sure to drop us a comment below telling us all about your personal relationship with gray hair. (Personally, I used to be scared of turning gray, but it’s already happening, and I’m starting to look like a silver fox which is awesome in so many ways!)

When you’re done enjoying this stylish list, Bored Panda invites you to have a look through our previous posts about the Grombre community here, here, and here. And you’ll also find our recent post about ‘freeing the silver’ right here.

More info: Grombre.com | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

#1

“I had my first grey hair when I was 11 and I started colouring my hair black later in my teens. I never actually hated my greys; I merely loved the colour black and I wanted to fit in – I wasn’t aware of anyone at my age having grey hair. However, I was lacking the confidence to expose my true colours until I turned 30 – just over a year ago and I wish I had ditched my dye earlier. I feel liberated for not having to hide my silver waves (plus tones of money and time saved) which I adore and make me look unique.”

Image credits: grombre

#2

“I never had the confidence to let my hair be natural. I covered those grays since they first started showing up at age 23. When I turned 40, my husband said I should just ‘let it go’ and stop coloring my hair. I told him I wasn’t ready for that, he said he respected that, but he wanted me to make a deal with him. He made me a deal that if I would let my hair be natural at age 50, he would take me on a dream vacation. I agreed, it was 10 years away! Long story short, I kept my end of the bargain (and so did he) and since allowing my silver to shine, I feel I’ve let my soul shine! I have more confidence at 52 than I’ve ever had. I love being so shiny!!”

Image credits: grombre

#3

“When I was 21, my sister was diagnosed with cancer — and my first stripe of white almost simultaneously appeared smack dab in the center of my head. We lost my sister a handful of years after her diagnosis after a long, painful battle. Within the same three months of losing her, my mother was diagnosed with cancer, my father had a massive heart attack and I underwent a mastectomy of my own. With every major event, more grays appeared. Amidst the chaos of life, I still found time to be horrified at this new addition to my hairstyle.I spent a decade fighting them, pushing back at every bright, wiry hair with chemicals and grim determination. But one day about 9 months ago, I was done. Life had been showing me my priorities in a not so gentle way — and I finally received her message. I no longer have time or patience to achieve an expected hair color. I’ve survived and thrived through so much worse than disappointing societal standards and expectations. Now at 31, I embrace my white hair and everything it stands for — every last hug, kiss or I love you, every tear or day that I’d have rather stayed in bed and didn’t, every war my family has fought and won. I am a warrior and my hair is a battle scar.”

Image credits: grombre

“We believe there are more important things in life than the beauty standards that women are so often told define our value, and we’re finding liberation and empowerment to live fully and celebrate the complexities that make us beautiful in each season of our lives,” Grombre defines its mission on its website.

With 231k followers on Instagram and 26k fans on Facebook, the Grombre community has nearly doubled its online following in around a year and a half.

#4

“I started greying at the ripe age of 13. I dyed my hair all thru my 20’s and 30’s. At age 39 with my mom’s encouragement I let my grey go and now I LOVE my salt & pepper crown! With my mom, who doesn’t have IG.”

Image credits: grombre

#5

“It has now been almost three years since I started the process and I am so glad I did! I just got my hair cut and with this trim, I think the last of my box-dye hair has been cut. So many stylists at the salon took a moment to comment on the lovely color of my hair. And when I’m out, I meet so many women who just have to ask about my hair and who are themselves yearning to be free of dying. I’m happy to be a part of this community of women who are proudly going gray.”

Image credits: grombre

#6

“This has been quite cathartic. I actually cried at the salon. I experienced a lot with the hair that I let go of today and over the last 10 months.It is amazing how much of your self esteem and identity can be wrapped up in your hair. Silly me…the best is yet to come!”

Image credits: grombre

Earlier, I spoke about gray hair with Ahu Michaelides who had been featured on the Grombre Instagram account.

“We are a group of women from all around the world with different backgrounds and stories but we have a similar approach to society’s standards of beauty which is: ‘You don’t need to fit in to be considered beautiful,’” she told Bored Panda during an interview.

#7

“I’ve colored my hair pink or purple for quite a few years now. It’s become a big part of my identity. I’d go in every few months to have my brown roots bleached out, to redo the whole thing fresh. Over the last several years, my husband became extremely ill and I became a caregiver. Then our marriage began massively unraveling. Then he died. Through all of it, I bleached and dyed. Through my stress, I bleached and dyed. It’s been nearly three years since his death, and only during my life’s huge exhale over the last year or so did I start to go lax on the bleaching. Imagine my surprise to find this, then, growing out. It’s like I finally let my body relax into all it had been through. This is my wisdom hair. My hard-won life lesson hair. And I love it.”

Image credits: grombre

#8

“I am 4 months into this process, 50, recently divorced, in love with a new man who not only supports me in this process but encourages me. I changed my Facebook profile picture to this photo last weekend and received so much love. It feels amazing to be happy, secure and owning my true self.”

Image credits: grombre

#9

“I had been coloring my hair since I was 20. It was never quite the right color, roots would show within a week, I had to plan colorings around special occasions, overall a giant pain in the butt. My goal was to turn 50 with long silver hair. With a little nudge from my very supportive husband, I finally stopped coloring in 2017, and I just turned 50 with long silver hair that I have grown to love. ?”

Image credits: grombre

For Michaelides, gray hair wasn’t much of a choice: it runs in her family and she’s had it since very early on. “I’ve always had gray hair since I was a teenager but back then gray hair was associated with older women only, so I didn’t even think of it as an option back then. So I started to dye my hair,” she opened up.

#10

“I’m 27 years old and have been slowly (or quickly for that matter) been going gray since I was 17! I’ve never dyed my hair because I consider my grays part of my identity. It reminds me of who I am and where I came from- I am my mother’s daughter, full of strength and resilience! It also represents my bond with my sisters, who are going through a grombre transition as well. I love my grays and wear them proudly. Your site has been a great reminder that beauty is about confidence and staying true to who you are.”

Image credits: grombre

#11

“After my fourth child was born in 2014, my thick, long hair was thinning, hopelessly dry, and so unhealthy. Over twenty years of hair dye, hormones, and stress had taken such a toll on my hair. So, I decided I was done with color forever. I didn’t know anyone who was thirty six with gray hair. I was so scared but also determined to see it through. I kept telling myself (and all the naysayers), “I can always dye it back.” Two years later, while pregnant with my youngest child, my hair was finally dye free. It was stronger, healthier, and thanks to pregnancy too, thicker. Growing it out was wonderfully liberating and completely discouraging at the same time. Now, I love my gray hair so much! I would never color it again. My teenage daughters call it my “famous” hair because everywhere I go, women ask me about it. How I grew it out, what it is like to go gray, how they wish they could go dye-free. It makes me so sad every time I hear that. Women feel trapped because society tells us we should fight aging with a box of hair dye. ? If you’re in the awkward process of growing out your grays or just considering it, keep going! You can do it! ❤️ These are photos from my two year journey. The one of me almost totally gray and totally pregnant is my favorite! ?”

Image credits: grombre

#12

“I have very thick hair and it grows very fast. Therefore, I was spending way too much money and time on maintaining it. My family and friends were against my decision to go gray. Simply put, it boiled down to me accepting and embracing myself. I did not set out to prove a point or gain attention. I just wanted the “freedom” to grow old in grace and live out Proverbs 16:31 ‘Gray hair is a crown of splendor; it is gained by a living a godly life.’ Swipe to see a photo of when I served in the USAF. I’m a Chaplain with the VA hospital in Houston and people may forget my name but NEVER my hair!! ?”

Image credits: grombre

“As the years went by, it became more and more difficult to maintain. I never really enjoyed spending hours and hours at the hairdressers, but back then it seemed like the only option. In the meantime, my mom’s hair had gone silver gradually and I really admired the color but again it was a ‘mom color.’”

#13

“I loved my brown hair as much as I love my grey. Infact I don’t see the transition to be difficult personally. I got greys in my early 20s. I colored them for several years till I wanted to. Stopped coloring when I didn’t want to. I have had greys on and off for a couple of years. And last year, I finally decided to not color them any more. I didn’t want to put unwanted chemicals in my body any more.Personally I don’t see much difference in myself with either brown or grey hair However, I do realise it’s different for others. Every now and then I have strangers looking at me in different ways ~ from being amused to being shocked. Some ask my age, some tell me I look odd, some whisper and laugh. I am growing used to all these now.I think there is no problem with coloring but I want people to realise ‘Not Coloring’ is also fine. It’s not weird and definitely not abnormal. It’s natural.”

Image credits: grombre

#14

“I truly feel that growing out my grey has been one of the biggest lessons in patience that I have ever experienced. I’m at about 16.5 months into the journey now. I spent 20 years dying my hair and towards the end I was doing weekly root touch ups even as I developed sores on my scalp. I was just never ready to stop. When was the ideal time? Would this negatively impact my life and career? Would I look older? And then after months of indecision, I just stopped. For no real reason… no special occasion. I just stopped out of the blue. The first 6 months were really difficult and I basically processed my anxiety about the whole ‘growing out my hair’ thing by reading the stories of other women, researching all the methods that were used to help transition, and thinking in loops about what I was going to do to make this all end quicker. Should I bleach it? Should I dye it back? Should I cut it all off? Every spin out I was no closer to a decision. I took it as a sign to just let it be. If nothing was sounding appealing, then what did I have to lose by just being patient and seeing how I felt tomorrow. Tomorrows became yesterdays over and over again, and now I don’t really think about it much… I just continue to let it be. 16.5 months later, I am starting to feel like myself. A new, different, more patient version of myself.So, here we are in quarantine. All of us waiting for information of when our lives will get back to some form of normal. Many of us filled with anxiety and not sure what this will mean for our lives. We keep researching and googling and trying to find the answer, and nothing is clear. So, all we are really left with is that we have to let it be. There may be tricky moments along the way and we may have a bumpy road to get there, but one day, not so long from now, I think we are all going to wake up to new, different, more patient versions of ourselves.”

Image credits: grombre

#15

“I have been dying my hair for 24 years now, since I was sixteen and found my first gray hair. Growing it out has not been easy, once I think I’ve grown out of one awkward stage, I hit another one. I look to the grombre Instagram for inspiration. It has been 9 months since I’ve dyed my hand and although frustrating it has been quite freeing, and in this current climate I’m so glad I don’t have to worry about my hair.”

Image credits: grombre

Michaelides said that she eventually decided to get a pixie cut and stop coloring her hair altogether to save time and money. “It felt like I’ve reconnected with my real self. Best decision I’ve ever made,” she shared.

#16

“I’ve dyed my hair for years, because I didn’t like the grey because society says you old. At almost approaching 48, I decided to embrace my grey, and forget what society says…I’m free from the negativity of having grey hair. Grey hair doesn’t make you old, it’s really hereditary. I feel more sexy, and complete. Loving the new me, can’t wait to see what it will look in months to come.”

Image credits: grombre

#17

“This has been an amazing lesson in sitting with my feelings. There has been some discomfort in this 3 year process but I’ve learned to sit with the discomfort and honor my own opinions and thoughts and goals and hold these in higher regard.”

Image credits: grombre

#18

“It is not just grey hair. It is a sagging skin, extra pounds, hot flashes, inability to hold on to my emotions and fear of becoming invisible. I still do it. I am always thinking, if others see me it will be a little easier for them to walk this walk. Also dance. I dance Argentine tango. If you don’t know what is your next step should be and you are going this tough time in your life, please consider taking dance lessons. It helped me a lot, it might help you too.”

Image credits: grombre

“For many years, silver hair has been associated with older women. And even getting older is a privilege that’s been given to men. A man with silver hair is considered attractive, but when it’s a woman, well, she’s simply old. And no one wants to be seen as old and unattractive and I understand that,” Michaelides explained to Bored Panda that there’s a double standard when it comes to gray hair.

#19

“My mom noticed my first grey hair when I was in about elementary school. I have never dyed my hair and have always embraced my grey streaks. While I have gotten pressured by family and friends to dye my hair, I never have. Some people even think I have professional highlights! I love my hair and the compliments I get make me feel beautiful and unique :)”

Image credits: grombre

#20

“Several years ago a close friend died of breast cancer very young. Shortly after that I was diagnosed with atypia in my breast tissue, underwent a minor surgery and was labeled high-risk of developing breast cancer by the medical community. For the next few years I worked hard to remove as many chemicals from my life as possible. I changed my family’s cleaning supplies, our diet, our skin and haircare products and kept studying and reading on reducing risks. Even though there is no direct medical evidence of breast cancer and hair dye in April of 2018 (before picture) I realized that I was not ok with chemicals soaking into my scalp every 5 weeks. My hair stylist, a great high school friend, was not a fan. She might have even “accidentally” put permanent color on my hair last September setting me back several months. I love her, but let someone else handle my hair after that. I cut my hair short to speed up the transition and now there is just a bit of my old color left. Tonight after a fresh cut, the ‘after’ photo, my husband said, ‘It’s all you!’ He is so supportive and loves me being just me. (Plus, now we match!) I can’t say I 100% love it everyday and don’t sometime long for sunkissed beach hair, but I can say I am proud of myself for not continuing to do something I did not want to do for fear of someone thinking I look old.”

Image credits: grombre

#21

“Silver hair is part of my history, it’s a given in my destiny as my maternal grandfather and my mother are completely silver. I have no desire to dye my hair and I’m thrilled that grey hair is now a popular fad! Each day that God allows me to live, I am less and less concerned with the opinion of others. At 52 years old, each wrinkle, smile line and grey hair have meaning and I embrace them because I certainly don’t look like what I’ve been through! Thank you Grombe for celebrating them!”

Image credits: grombre

“They should [stop dyeing their hair] for themselves to feel free and to feel comfortable in their own skin. Once they realize they’re beautiful regardless, people will see them through their eyes too,” she told Bored Panda earlier.

#22

“2/29/20: We woke that morning together, had breakfast at our favorite diner as we do every Saturday and then drove to our friend’s cabin in Winthrop Maine …and when the time felt right we said, ‘Now?!’ A few minutes later in a pink velvet dress on a frozen lake at sunset with a wind chill temperature in the negative we secretly eloped in a private ceremony on Leap Day. We wrote our own vows and tied a fisherman’s knot to seal the deal. And yes, our officiant WAS wearing a Viking helmet. Followed up with champagne & chocolate cake.”

Image credits: grombre

#23

“In light of our current quarantine situation, I intentionally practice daily gratitudes. One of mine that may seem insignificant or menial to many has been a great blessing to me…no hair color! The journey for great health led me to choose breast implant explantation about a year and a half ago. Among a plethora of serious health issues, I believe one side effect of those toxins in my body was rapid greying. I choose to embrace my “sparkles” and I’m ever so happy I did! Hopefully I’m providing inspiration to others to embrace your “youness” and let your beauty radiate! Greys and All! In this extremely stressful, uncertain time, it’s even more important than ever to recognize all of the blessings in our lives. We have so much to be thankful for! Give love, grace, and kindness without reserve and don’t worry about covering your roots! ”

Image credits: grombre

#24

“ONE YEAR ago I decided to #grombre ??? 3 questions I get asked the most: ‘Do you feel older?’ Nope! Still feel like 25 inside even though I’m 37. (Won’t lie though, the first few months seeing myself in the mirror took some adjusting of my mental lense on age and beauty!) ‘I wish I could be as brave as you! How’d you finally decide to do it?’ (this question is asked the most) First of all this decision has *nothing* to do with bravery. Bravery is an honorable word devoted to those deserving it, not for us growing out our gray hairs. I’ve been thinking about growing my hair out for YEARS but it wasn’t until last March I officially decided to. I was asked by a friend to go to a lifelong dream event and turned it down because I couldn’t get in to have my roots covered in time (boxed dyes stopped covering the white for me a few years ago). I’ve never cared what others thought of my white hairs, I just didn’t like the way it looked on my head, didn’t ‘feel’ like me!) Right after I told my friend no and ended the call was my ‘ah ha!’ moment – I was done planning my life around the next root touch up. DONE! And called her right back and said, ‘count me in!’ white hairs and all! ‘Do you miss your dark hair?’ Yes! YES I DOOO! But I know this isn’t the glorified body I’ll be Home in so until then here’s to embracing these shimmering highlights “

Image credits: grombre

For Michaelides, silver hair is just like any other hair color and shouldn’t be discounted because of its associations. “If you’re happy with yourself, with who you are, your energy will identify you, not your age and not your hair. Don’t let society make you think you’re not beautiful enough just because you’re different. You’re beautiful because you’re different!”

#25

“I got yelled at by a man in a deli for supposedly dying my hair gray. He said it looked so unnatural. I just laughed. I went gray in my 20s and kept it. My young students really love it. They think I’m a character from Frozen.”

Image credits: grombre

#26

“I feel like I read a ‘grey hair rule’ that said to not wear grey … that it’ll wash you out or something? Here is to breaking all of the rules then, because I am discovering that I love the way I look in grey (hair and clothes!)!! And any other color I want to wear!”

Image credits: grombre

#27

“Three years ago I had to get a bone marrow transplant and decided to let my hair come in naturally. I’ve actually been going great since I was 15 but over the last 10 to 15 years I have been dying my hair. Since gray is such a fashion statement now, I get a lot of questions from people asking if I get my hair done when the reality is all I do is take good care of my natural gray hair.”

Image credits: grombre

Your hair turns white when the pigmentation cells that are responsible for color (aka melanin) stop being produced. Your hair color can be affected by various factors, from nutrition and hormones to stress. However, largely, whether or not we go gray early on in life depends on our genes.

#28

“Being silver for me means that I am able to be more of myself… peeling back the layers. I am beautiful. I am a woman maturing gracefully. One thing that I have learned is that someone is always watching. By loving myself and being more of myself I’m creating a space where other girls and women can do the same. I’m showing them another way to BE.”

Image credits: grombre

#29

“Greek ancestry on my mother’s side destined me to gray early in life. I developed a gray streak in my brown hair at the top of my head during high school. Silly me, I dyed my poor hair for three decades. Finally, in my 50’s, I got a crew cut and endured an Ugly Duckling stage for a year. I’ve had fun with white hair well into my 60’s and I’ll never go back to dye. Now, I’m That Swan. “

Image credits: grombre

#30

“’Your hair are a masterpiece’, it’s what a man recently said to me in a museum. Such a nice compliment!I’m 46 now, but I’ve had gray hair since I was 20 years old, like my mum. When the grey hair was few, I used to put henna, then I began with chemical colors. At the beginning It was not so bad, I could change my color and have some fun, but after fifteen years the fun was gone! Too much time and effort, too much money!I saw my mum at that time. She also put chemicals the all life long and she had so thin hair…so I decided: not chemicals any more! I leave my hair natural. All the family was against this decision. Only a dear friend supported me.But I went ahead and I was proud of it. And I proud of it now. My hair are a particular feature that makes me stand out from other people.So I am!”

Image credits: grombre

How you react to going gray, however, depends purely on you. Do you embrace it and go all-natural? Do you reject it and dye your hair? That depends on each and every single one of us. Let us know what you think, dear Pandas!

#31

“At one point when I was in my 30’s a sweet little girl said to me ‘I love your hair, it is like glitter. It has magic in it’. I never turned back, it felt like a superpower.I went grey very early in life and the prospect of having my hair dyed every few weeks felt like a lot of time and money spent focused on my hair. At my core I am a tomboy and that focus on hair/self felt out of alignment with who I was. I preferred to spend the time/money outdoors and on adventures. My grey hair isn’t a statement, it is a reflection of what I value and who I am.”

Image credits: grombre

#32

“I started coloring my hair when I was 14. Ever since a boy pointed out that I had a grey hair. I realize now that from a young age I hid behind my hair, not just from my hair. I grew it out long and full and whatever color made me most confident at the time. The truth was that I had zero confidence in myself. I always felt too skinny. Or too fat. Too boring. Or too smart. I was never happy in my own skin. I got attention for my long lush hair and I embraced that. As I got into my twenties, I discovered that my reproductive system was anything but normal. I learned that I was perimenopausal at 28 when I was trying to get pregnant. My greying hair made sense and I resented it. It was an indicator of everything that was wrong with me. I became more determined to hide it. It wasn’t going to get the best of me. I’m not sure if it was the change in my hormones, being a new mom (we adopted our son months after learning about my infertility) or simple laziness, but I began putting weight on quickly. For almost 8 years it continued. One day I stepped on the scale and decided to stop hiding. I decided in that moment to change my attitude and lifestyle. I became a healthier person – both physically and mentally. I also chopped off my hair and stopped coloring it. I was ready to stop hiding and making excuses for myself. I wasn’t a victim. I decided to embrace my grey hair instead of being ashamed of it. My grey hair wasn’t a sign of my body’s inadequacies, but rather a celebration of my uniqueness. A year later I was 30 lb lighter and grey! For the first time I could remember I felt free. And myself. I love my grey hair and every single thing it represents about me.”

Image credits: grombre

#33

“My choice to go naturally grey had to do with that specific moment almost 3 years ago. I took a good look at myself in the mirror wondering what would happen if I quit dying my hair. At first I couldn’t bare the thought of ‘looking’ older. But once they came through and I embraced my greys like I do today. I even felt more confident than during the time I dyed my hair. Whenever I get the chance to convince others to embrace their greys, I also tell them that they always can dye their hair again. I truly love my hair now! ”

Image credits: grombre

#34

“I started going grey in my late 30s for a while I would dye my hair back to its natural grey. When I turned 40 I decided to just let my grey come through. I am now 51 and I love my all natural grey hair. I have completely natural hair which means I don’t use any chemicals. My grey hair makes me feel strong and confident. I like to show that a woman can have grey hair and still be sexy, beautiful and stylish.”

Image credits: grombre

#35

“After getting my first gray hairs at 16, I decided 1 year ago to go natural after dying my hair for years. At 35 I had mental health problems, going natural is a part of my healing process to really accept and love myself for who I am. I’m 39 now and very proud of myself able to say I’m ok.”

Image credits: grombre

#36

“My gray journey started at age 21! I started coloring my hair and then at age 30, I developed an allergy to hair color. I HAD to embrace every bit of it, and it was rough at first. There were people telling me to color my hair, and I was growing tired of telling them that I couldn’t. I made the decision to ‘own’ my grays.”

Image credits: grombre

#37

“I heard there’s a hoarding of hair dye now with the “stay at home” order due to Covid 19. So glad that’s not an issue for me since I decided to let my natural hair grow out and that is one less thing that I don’t have to worry about. During this pandemic, many Individuals are at increased risk for symptoms of anxiety and depression due to financial uncertainties and isolation. If you or a loved one is experiencing this, know that you are not alone and that there are some resources that you can tap into. I recommend Insight Timer, Calm, or Headspace apps for meditation and mindfulness to manage those symptoms. Hang in there, we’re all in this together.”

Image credits: grombre

#38

“In December 2016, I was 42 with an 11 month old and bemoaning my ‘disrespectful’ grey halo that I needed to henna/indigo. Two younger colleagues at work who always expressed their love of silver hair said to me, ‘Why don’t you stop dyeing it and let it grow out?’ My response was, I’m not ready yet, maybe when I’m 50. They responded (due to my length), ‘If you start now, you’ll be done by the time you’re 50!’Well, a few short months later, around May of 2017, I still hadn’t gotten around to that henna/indigo. They grey was no longer a halo, but a thick headband. I was on vacation at my in-laws and was in the bathroom in a marathon session washing my hair. I had slacked on doing it for weeks and was going through massive shedding that I couldn’t understand, but now believe was because I was nearing the end of menopause. After dealing with it, I looked at the dye bottles on the counter. I was planning to forgo henna and just do a quick color with Jazzing. I looked at the bottles and thought of my family and 1 1/2 year old upstairs with whom I had already lost 2-3 hours of time. And I thought of the additional 1-2 hours I would need to spend applying dye, waiting, rinsing, conditioning, and styling my hair. And I was tired. In that moment, I was just so over it. And my grey hair journey that had begun in December, unbeknownst to me, officially started.It wasn’t smooth sailing, there were a lot of bumps in the road in the first year and a half. Doubt, insecurity, negative comments. But I had started following Grombre and others and was always looking at inspo pics to help me stay the course. I remember telling an older colleague who would come behind me and whisper ‘Dye it!’…. ‘The road is rough, I admit it. But I have seen the destination and think it will be worth it.’I cut off about the last 5 1/2” of colored hair this weekend. And today, I stand here at the destination. And guess what? It was DEFINITELY worth it. I am so happy I made the decision as I love my silver and being comfortable in my own skin. And my two colleagues were right, at 48, I’m done before I turned 50!”

Image credits: grombre

#39

“I love photography. I enjoy standing behind the camera more than in front of it, yet I feel comfortable and confident when the lens points at me. This is analog photography though, suddenly a whole different story. My confidence seems to fade away as soon as my boyfriend, a professional photographer, wants to capture me on film. I know there’s no quick displaying of the images as he shoots, there’s no correcting, no preview, no second chance. This is me trying to stop him from taking this shot. I wasn’t wearing any make up, had a bad hair day and felt tired. As soon as he grabs his camera and points at me I feel vulnerable and exposed. But then he makes me laugh, he always makes me laugh …. and shoots. Interesting how this doesn’t happen to me when he shoots digital, I don’t feel as self conscious, I guess I know I can always delete the shot if I don’t look ‘good enough’ then I surely tend to be my own worst critic. I’ve given a lot of thought whether to share this image or not, then although I feel confident in my own skin and don’t need to hide my “imperfections” this appears ‘too natural, too real, too imperfect’ to me. But this is exactly what analog photography is all about. Capturing a moment you can’t recreate, telling a story … When I look at this image now I remember the moment we shared at the park, I remember him telling me how beautiful I look and me refusing to have my picture taken, because that day, for some reason, I don’t believe it myself. Thank you @_mpix for loving me as I am and for capturing some great moments we shared. I love you “

Image credits: grombre

#40

“My mom found my first grey hair when I was 12 years old (I didn’t even know that was possible!!) She always warned me that I might go grey earlier than most, but I never imagined I’d be so young. As I got older, the grey patch at the very top of my head became harder and harder to cover. My lovely hair dresser convinced me to embrace it and I stopped covering my grey hair at 24. I’ve now been growing it out for 2 years, and get low lights a few times a year to help it blend more since I’m not completely grey. I am learning to embrace it more and more every day. No one ever believes that I am this grey at 26! I am a teacher and my little students are often baffled – ‘you don’t even have kids yet and your hair is so grey!’ I just blame them for stressing me out! But really I should blame, or rather thank, my mom!”

Image credits: grombre

#41

“Hello I am Jaqueline Bergrós, 30 years old, musical actress from Germany. I had my first grey hair at the age of 18. At this time I didn’t think to much about it. At 21 I started to color my hair regularly. At 25 I had to color it every 3 weeks. I was always told that I was too young for white hair. I was constantly asked whether I had a deficiency or a genetic defect. Either way, it was clear to everyone and so for me, I had to hide it. Nobody should see that I have white hair ‘much too early’. Especially in my job. I’m working on stage and I have to be a type at auditions. Who wants to see a grey-haired Jasmine in Aladdin? I was ready to bear more and more allergic reactions, hair breakage and hair loss and considered it to be ‘normal’. The more I colored my white hair, the faster they were visible again. Today I know: my white hair wants to be seen.On March 5th 2020 I colored my hair the last time and decided that my health is more important to me than having brown hair. I don’t want to hide and lock myself in a cage any longer. I was very afraid to show myself, especially for negative reactions. Since I let my grey hair grow out, I have received countless compliments and great admiration. I shine in a new light because I am simply me. The way I am. Some even ask me if my grey hair is dyed. Many people simply can’t get the picture of a young woman and grey hair together. It is a journey and sometimes it is not easy. I decided to go on this trip and I don’t regret a single day. I can’t wait to let go the last bit of color and live my gray to the tips.”

Image credits: grombre

#42

“Hi everyone! My name’s Alex and I’ve been dye free since June 2017. I decided to stop dying because at the rate I was graying, I’d have to get a touch up every week. I’m super low maintenance so this was an easy decision. I was excited to go on this journey and to see who I would become and how I would look with gray hair. It’s been a fabulous adventure so far. Embracing my grays has been very empowering and liberating. I’ve learned to accept and love my imperfections. My motto is imperfection is perfection. Feel free to ask me about my grays, keloid scars, and arthritis at a young age. We’re who we are because of the things we’re forced to deal with, and knowing who we truly are is a immeasurable gift to ourselves. Thank you for reading and I hope to connect with you all online and in real life!!”

Image credits: grombre

#43

“I found my first grey at 24. I had just dyed my hair dark brown after my wedding and there it was. This little bright white strand of glitter sticking right out of the top of my head. I remember thinking at the time “WTF IM ONLY 24 MY LIFE IS JUST STARTING!!”. But there it was. Staring right back at me saying “YOU’RE OLD”. I wasn’t old. And I’m not now. But we’re taught that greying means ageing and all of this means we’re old. And being old means we’re boring and slow and have dinner at 4pm.Of course it didn’t stop there. These dreaded silver hairs kept coming and I kept dyeing them away.I remember my mother doing the same when she was about 40. I remember as a child her complaining about this “greyness”. I didn’t see her natural hair colour again for 20 years.When I did it was a shocking bright white. It had lost its curl (that was she was famous for) and all its pigment. My sister and I had convinced her to stop dyeing her hair after suffering some hair loss.I remember my first thought being “I hope my hair looks like that when I go grey”. What I decided then was that I would not put myself through the decades of stress and cover-up. I would be different. I would be brave. I would let myself age.What I didn’t know then was that this no dye ageing process would start at 35. When I was a kid only hippies and the no-makeup moms were grey that early.Fast forward to today. I haven’t dyed my hair in over a year and my current colour is best described as #greyishblond. I’m greying exactly like my father -early and streaked from my upper temples- and I’ve connected with some really amazing women who are doing the same.”

Image credits: grombre

#44

“The first time I noticed I had a few greys was back in 2002 during my 2nd year in university. I never really thought about it; if I dyed my hair I dyed it; if not, then not. It was always about the color I wanted at the time rather than hiding my greys. It was only about 18 months ago that I really started noticing how my greys really kicked in and have a style of their own.. Ever since then I left my natural colors be and I couldn’t be happier! I even get stopped by ladies asking me where I got my platinum highlights! I love how unique it is and knowing that no dyed hair can ever look quite the same!”

Image credits: grombre

#45

“I started going gray at 15 and wouldn’t have it any other way. ”

Image credits: grombre

#46

“To those of you who are uncertain about embracing your natural gray, I say this: Take a huge, delicious breath and have faith that in a few short months you’ll look back on your decision as one of the most empowering, aligned choices of your life.I’m two years into this journey and my silver stripes are hitting my collarbones now. I see myself in the mirror, and it all finally fits—my 46-year-old face with its soft laugh lines and gentle crow’s feet, plus my salt-and-pepper strands. I look like ME, and I am joyfully up to my elbows in the process of learning to love ME, just as I am.This amazing community of #silversisters will hold your hand while you jump into this process. But I promise that soon, you’ll unlace your fingers from ours because you’ll need your wings to fly on your own. You’ll feel free, authentically yourself, and you’ll wonder why you ever thought it was such a big deal to sparkle freely.Oh, and for those awkward moments at cocktail parties, here’s my favorite quip:‘Actually I’m not letting myself go—I’m just letting myself BE.’”

Image credits: grombre

#47

“In December 2017 I was with my husband in Ethiopia where he works.. living the expat life then everything changed.  After spending Christmas at home in Wales, I was diagnosed with throat cancer.  Thankfully it was caught very early so no Chemo but the radiotherapy was gruelling.  After being given the all clear I couldn’t wait to get back to normal.  That included, dental work and of course my then normal meant going to the hairdresser ASAP to sort out my hair colour.Every two weeks when the silvers poked out, I did think ‘should I just leave them grow out?  but  I know I looked so tired from the RT’ so I hung on to the colour. I returned to Ethiopia and on a trip to Somaliland in June 2019, I thought ENOUGH! I was now eating more healthily, I was taking better care of my skin after RT,  so why was I still putting chemicals on my head??I told my husband who said ‘go for it’ although I know he isn’t a fan of this awkward growing out stage.  My sister-in-law said to me ‘you are way too young to join the silver brigade’. Too young? I’m 60 next year!  My children are my biggest supporters always reassuring me. My daughter at 32 and like me started going grey in her 20s, is now contemplating joining me and stop colouring her hair. I now alternate between Ethiopia, where my husband is working and the UK, my home and where my children and mum are.  4 months into the grow out I now feel more comfortable and can go out without a scarf or hat. Grey hair is still seen as somewhat letting oneself go here in Ethiopia but I really don’t care. I am a little scared however of the reaction of my Sudanese mother in-law when we visit in the New Year.  Tips welcome. Beating cancer and embracing my grey makes me feel so strong. I’m an Aries so patience through the awkward stage is hard but new found strength wins. I worry less (much less) of what others think of me, and I feel so much more beautiful and confident in my ageing skin and silver curls .. I am definitely loving this new more natural me.”

Image credits: grombre

#48

“Owning and exposing my natural grey hair was a peaceful communion with my personal struggles; of self, of family, of femininity, of beauty. The unknown is often the most unexpected expression of contentment. I couldn’t pay for a better colourist. I couldn’t feel more liberated. I couldn’t be more me. I’m thankful for this movement…this allowance, this release, this honesty. It doesn’t deplete beauty; it enhances and encourages it.”

Image credits: grombre

#49

“I stopped coloring my hair on my birthday five years ago. I’m 47 now and am often surprised to realize that I’m still only about 85% of the way to accepting my hair. It’s so easy to love it when you’re receiving compliments. It’s very cool like this. Do I still love it when I’m asked if I want the senior discount or I’m told that my mother and I could be sisters? No. I start to wonder what would happen if I colored my hair again. Could I still pass for 40?! This process has forced me to confront my own fears and prejudices relating to aging but, more importantly, it has made it clear to me that I still care too much about what other people think about my hair and my perceived age. It’s funny — I stopped worrying about my very average looking mom body a long time ago and have made peace with it but I still have hang-ups about my hair. I am working through it and it gets easier every year. A 100% gray hair acceptance rate will be mine!!”

Image credits: grombre

#50

“Last year, my husband and I quit our jobs, sold our home and all our possessions and bought one way tickets to Asia to travel around the world with our two daughters for a year. We both were consumed by jobs that demanded more time at work than with our children or pursuing things that we were passionate about. We decided to make some sweeping changes in order to spend more time together as a family.I knew that I would not be able to keep up with dyeing my hair while traveling, so I stopped dyeing right before we left. But as I moved through the transition process, I struggled a bit with deeply ingrained notions about ‘going gray’ in our culture. These beauty myths kept me stuck in a trance of unworthiness for decades, perpetuating a cycle of dyeing my hair every few weeks out of fear of appearing ‘older.’ On those days where I question things, I have learned to sit in those moments of doubt and uncertainty and work my way through them, recognizing that they are not truths, only myths perpetuated by the beauty and ‘anti-aging’ industry that has a huge financial incentive in keeping women stuck in a shame cycle about aging. I’m glad I stuck with it, because after 10 months, I’ve discovered that my silver hair does not make me look ‘older’; in fact, it looks much more natural and complements my skin tone. I’m embracing this new season of my life instead of fighting against it. Part of this process has involved letting go of others’ opinions and the cultural narrative that has told us that women aging is a negative thing. This last year has involved taking risks, questioning assumptions, reclaiming my power and embracing my true self. I’m immensely grateful to be living a life that feels more authentic, both inside and out.”

Image credits: grombre

#51

“I am interested in embracing beauty standards for women/myself that are rooted in reality. Women are beautiful creatures at any age. Liberating myself from ideas that it’s shameful to age and show it and that somehow as women we lose our value in society. We value ourselves. End of sentence. My hair is colouring itself now, how cool is that? ?”

Image credits: grombre

#52

“To the non-grombre ladies… how’s it going w/ your involuntary grow out? Are you freaking out? Are you about to go buy some box-dye? Are you kind curious about maybe just embracing it?Most women I talk to can’t honestly even say what their natural color is anymore. I was like that too, for 16 years.I get what you’re going through right now. Even though my growout was voluntary, I still had the same feelings you have right now. When you look in the mirror you can’t help but immediately glance up, right? You want to just wear your hair up, right? You’re worried people will notice the obvious dye line, even on zoom and FaceTime, right?I just want you to know I get it. The only difference between us is that I chose this. That’s it. So, again, I get the feels.I want to just share with you the thing I ran through my mind when I was in the thick of the growout stress. Even if you’re not ready to embrace this, even if this is temporary until your salon opens up again, even if you breakdown and go buy a box of dye at CVS next week. I just want you to consider one thought:.‘What am I *supposed* to look like?’.The beauty in this world is that you get to control what you look like. And I think you’re killing it. I think you’re beautiful. I think you’re doing a perfect job – and choosing exactly the right colors, and styles, and finishing touches.And I think it could be a good journaling exercise to even consider this question. Even if it’s just for a few moments.I’m so happy I found out what I’m supposed to look like. It went beyond my hair and into my body. I did away with choices that were preventing me from seeing how my whole being is supposed to look, feel, and thrive.What a cool opportunity for you to do the same right now… even if it’s just for a little while, while we all sort this madness out.I love you. You are NOT just your hair. You are an essence, a smile, an aura, and a face of such mysterious life behind your eyes.Breathe easy. We see who you really are. No dye has ever changed that.”

Image credits: grombre

#53

“I had just turned 27 years old. I had just moved into my own apartment. I found myself driving back to my mom’s house to dye my hair – I didn’t dare to stain my own beautiful, white, bathroom.I had spent the last year on a journey to accept myself. I had gone into therapy, travelled, solo backpacked through the Canadian backyard, heck – I even performed and hosted a stand up comedy show. Yet, there I was – running back to dye my greying hair black.My maternal grandfather was fully grey at 25. My own mother and her sisters have been dying their hair since early 20’s. Everyone I knew with grey hair, masked it. I – I wanted to break the chain. I was BORN with grey hair – its not even a symbol of age for me. I grew older, and my greys grew with me. I grew into me and I grew into my silver crown.”

Image credits: grombre

#54

“My first memory of going gray was during my sophomore year of high school. I was sitting in science class when a friend of mine ask to pull one of them out of my head. Ha! I don’t really remember being embarrassed but I guess it was the first time I’d even consciously thought about it. Which is some what surprising as my mother was also full blown gray for almost as long as I remembered her. It was common nature in our household and my mom rocked it always, no problem. Clearly I was not ready to rock that look as a self centered teen who’s self consciousness rules her entity. It took me a good 22 years to finally say, ‘I’ve had it!’ I’m so sick of the skunk stripe that shows up literally every 3 weeks. I have two kids, a part time job at their school, after school activities and I just didn’t have time to dye it myself, let alone the money to go do it professionally in that time frame. So at 36, I grew it out and with the help of my stylist, who I really only booked haircuts, helped me transition into what you see today. I have to say, it’s pretty nice not to have to worry about it and I am honestly lucky at this point in time that gray hair is some what fashionable. Finally rocking it like my mother before me. I don’t know why I questioned doing it for so long. It has always been a part of me and once I had it out for the whole world to see, nothing felt more natural.”

Image credits: grombre

#55

“I jerked my first gray hair out of my scalp at sixteen. I was quite proud of finding that one gray hair. Nevertheless, I pulled it out and continued to remove each new gray I found until I turned 24 and decided it was time to quit if I didn’t want to be bald.I had always envisioned a natural gray maturity. My grandmother had a beautiful “skunk streak” in middle age, my mother was showing signs of her own streak by then, and I didn’t want to miss out if I was blessed with the same DNA! However, all that seemed ages away, so in the meantime I had fun with color once or twice a year. I didn’t intend to hide anything, just to satisfy my itch for something new now and then. All that changed when I developed a serious bacterial infection while traveling. I didn’t recover easily. I was in and out of hospital for months, sometimes fighting for my life. I was isolated, unable to work, running out of money and unable to visit a hairdresser. (Sound familiar?) The stress caught up with my hair follicles. Most of my hair fell out, a sprinkling of silver turned solid gray almost overnight, and I found myself doing what I never dreamed I’d do: buying drugstore kits to cover ugly gray roots. One day I’d had enough. I looked in the mirror at the shadow of myself I had become and realized I had nothing to lose. The painful growing-out process began. I nearly lost my nerve a few times over the next year. The worst was being tagged in photos. I could imagine old friends gasping “Did you SEE that pic of Laurel? Has she ever let herself go!” But then one day a trim took off the last of the fake color. I began to get well again and the hair I had lost grew back in. And finally, some of the stress grays gave place to brunette again until one day I looked in the mirror and realized my dream had come true: I have my grandmother’s streaks after all. I saw a meme the other day about all the gray roots we’ll see after Covid-19 and I was thankful. Thankful I’ve been through the growing-out already. And thankful to know that all difficult things eventually grow out.”

Image credits: grombre

#56

“I’m 24 years old. I started to grey when I was around 10 years old. Though I battled the insecurities of having grey hair at such a young age, I never dyed it. At 24, I love it and am curious what it will be like down the line. I also had to learn to love my curly hair, and now I’m proud to have both.”

Image credits: grombre

#57

“Ten years ago my husband went from an active 62 year old attorney, playing softball and orchestral French horn, to, in 24 hours, a man completely paralyzed by Guillain-Barre Syndrome and on a ventilator in ICU. He spent 8.5 months in the hospital recovering his breathing, his voice and ability to eat solid foods. Then we entered a year where my care at home with the heavy lift of using a Hoyer lift and feeding him was our Life. I was 56 and when I finally really looked up at myself, I saw my chestnut locks with a sprinkle of grey had completely transformed to a shock of bright white. I went to a hairdresser and was happily convinced to ‘Go with it!’ I did.I’ve loved my shiny silver hair, I get lots of compliments and questions about how I it got so beautiful. I usually just smile and say ‘lucky I guess.’ I DID have to learn how to adjust to a very different value system in my wardrobe, but find new combinations of color an exciting challenge.”

Image credits: grombre

#58

“Being a US Army wife and mother did not leave much time for self care. Instead of embracing the gray, I spent a fortune every month coloring and highlighting It. To stretch the color, I would use makeup, color hair sprays and hats. It was awful.I decided to go gray in 2012. My youngest was seven and her birthday fell on grandparents day. I brought her lunch and my sparkling silver stripe down the middle of my dark brown hair entitled me to a ‘grandparent’s day’ photo with my daughter. Not good. I transitioned to blond thinking the gray would be less noticeable coming in. For three years I fought it.For me, the transition made me feel old. Watching the aging process through your hair can be depressing. BUT DO NOT GIVE UP!I have been gray for 5 years now and I am so thankful I pushed through it! It absolutely does NOT age you! You will shine, your eyes will pop, and your silver crown will sparkle.”

Image credits: grombre

#59

“I was compelled to stop dying my hair by the realization that I was only hiding my natural beauty. At first my family and friends where confused and thought I was letting myself go/abandoning my self care. But I explained I was only truly embracing it and fiercely falling in love with my natural beauty. Outsiders many times doubled glances at me. In a funny way everyone is extra respectful towards me since lol. I have learned that being different is beautiful.”

Image credits: grombre

#60

“As a kid I always had one or two strands of gray hair. I’ve always been so proud of my small bit of gray. I have tried highlights and some rinses but the maintenance c.e was too much effort. I’m now 41 and it feels like the minute I turned 40 the gray started taking over. I often get stopped to ask who do I go to for my highlights. … although this is flattering I have still felt unsure of the sudden gray dominance. I am slowly learning to love this new look and new phase. I am embracing new hairstyles which make the gray the hero.I’m so thankful to have found this page. I’m inspired by women who have shared their stories. It has helped me to feel confident that this new salt and pepper can be stylish and sexy and that I definitely shouldn’t start dying my hair now! Thank you @grombre”

Image credits: grombre

#61

“As a professional makeup artist and esthetician, I’ve spent over a decade passionately pouring myself into helping other women come to a place of confidence and self acceptance (at every age, but working with women who are 40+ has always felt significant to me). While hiking on a lovely autumn afternoon last year, I had an epiphany. I have not been honoring my own beauty philosophy. I’ve always feared that when I age (specifically when I allow my hair to grow silver), I would somehow become invisible. Through the years, I have witnessed how most beauty brands market to aging women…they make us feel as if we need to be fixed. I believe that we need to be celebrated. And now It’s time for me to celebrate myself.“

Image credits: grombre

#62

“I look like my grandma. As my gray hair filters in, I am just now seeing it. At the end of her life, my proud Mexican-American grandmother had a mass of white hair which she wore in a messy bun daily. Sadly though, I must confess that I have had a difficult time admitting that I ‘look like my grandma’ because I don’t want to see myself as ‘old’. And yet, my grandmother was beautiful. Stories told about her youth always included the fact that she was a beauty, a looker. As she let her white hair have it’s way, she remained not only beautiful, but authentic and bold. Now I am beginning to see things differently. The decision to allow my hair to be it’s natural color is proving to me that I not only look like my dear grandmother, but more importantly, I carry within me her courageous spirit to be myself, to buck the system and to stand tall. This is not ‘old’ it’s ageless.”

Image credits: grombre

#63

“I grew up in a family where generation after generation, the women were blessed to look younger than their age, so I never really gave much thought towards going grey. Sporting dreadlocks at the age of 40, I was preparing to move out of the U.S. for a job opportunity, when a friend brought to my attention that I had “grey bits” that needed dying and offered to pay for the coloring as my going away gift. So for “fun” I took her up on it. Soon after arriving in the country I started working as a singer and felt I had to keep up with the coloring. It became a horrible burden and my locks became dry and brittle. I also faced a situation I never imagined that would be an issue: attracting the wrong type of people and not being respected because I looked younger. I was proud of my age and had no problem embracing it. With the advice of an African beautician, I cut off my damaged dreads and stopped dying my hair and I have never looked back. It’s funny, living in a country where the women are really displeased with grey hair and most are into coloring, don’t really notice my grey. I think it’s because I’ve come to see and enjoy the natural beauty of mine. It’s liberating and makes me happy.”

Image credits: grombre

#64

“How did I do it? How did I become so okay with going gray? – these are the questions I’ve been regularly asked.Now, after I’ve reached one year of going gray, my transition seems so natural and so right, I own it, I don’t notice people staring at me anymore (whether they stopped doing so or I stopped looking for their stares). But I still remember the beginning: vulnerable, caring too much about what others say, disliking my reflexion in the mirror, feeling old and ugly. Oh, I would dye my hair immediately at those unconfident times! And I did! After 4 months of growing out!!! I dyed my hair, but the euphoria disappeared too fast – a couple of days after the dye, when my white roots started glimpsing in the sun… That was when I realized there was no way back and re-started growing out. I could keep on self-critisizing or try to find beauty in my transformation. The choice was too obvious for me.I must say that documenting the progress, taking a lot of selfies, trying new hairstyles, changing haircare and my blog helped me greatly to feel confident about my decision, have fun and start to really love my colors! And I enjoy my new hobby – playing with my demarcation line and experimenting with various hairdos!I think that most of our struggles while going gray origin from our self-perception. I often hear that I have beautiful colors in my hair, but a while ago the same colors seemed very ugly to me. So, ladies in struggle, give yourself some time to get used to the new look, to figure it out how to play with hairstyles during the transition, to meet the new YOU on those selfies! And remember that gray hair doesn’t make you old or ugly, it makes you look unique with the hair color that no dye can replicate!”

Image credits: grombre

#65

“I started getting white hair in my 30s, and for twenty years I have been diligently and compulsively covering them. Frequent visits to the hairdresser? Me! Mascara or spray to cover the roots? Me! Bad mood when the roots started to appear? Me!Then Covid happened. I took the confinement very seriously here in Paris, and I was lucky as I could work remotely. Home hair coloring is not my thing, so I let the white hair making a bigger appearance, making sure to curb its enthusiasm with dark spray. One day, after the shampoo, it clicked! My white hair appeared shining to me. I said to myself ‘hey, wait a moment, you have silver hair!’ I loved them, I loved my new look, and since that moment there is no turning back.”

Image credits: grombre

#66

“I found my first grey when I was 18 and was devastated. For over 10 years I continued to spend lots of time and LOTS of money making sure to hide my roots every 4 weeks. It became exhausting. I came across the grey hair movement on Instagram and noticed so many young women my age embracing their beautiful silver hair. I wasn’t sure how mine would look since I never truly gave it a chance. Last year I decided to let it grow and I freakin loved it. After 4 months of grow out, I went to a salon to dye the rest to match my roots and unfortunately- she ended up covering up and bleaching my natural grow out. So I had to start over (with the help of another wonderful stylist). It’ll be a year in July and everyday I’m amazed at how beautiful I feel with my grey. I do get impatient sometimes but the combination of being pregnant and stuck in lock down- it’s been the perfect time to just ride the wave. Going grey is teaching me patience, everyday. It’s making me realize the ideals of beauty CAN evolve and grow and change. I don’t feel I look any older than I am. Soon I’ll be 30 and a mom and a woman who feels confident in my own skin. And that’s truly thanks to you and this beautiful community of grey haired beauties. Now it’s time to get my mom on board!”

Image credits: grombre

#67

“It wasn’t a well-thought out decision. I was just sick of dying my hair. So I stopped. I admit I did give it a few moments thought each month, but then by not really addressing it, it just happened. My hair was grey. tbh, only streaked with grey. But I was surprised at how much attention it got. Cashiers at Walgreens, who normally just blur through, ‘Are you a rewards member?’, were closing out interactions with an unexpected, ‘I really like your hair.’ Everywhere I went people were telling me how amazing my hair was. I was proud. I felt empowered. I felt I could be one small piece in updating beauty standards for women. And then I was grabbing a coffee with my friend who casually mentioned, ‘I like your hair.’ ‘A few women have told me I’m brave,’ I loftily replied. (They have.) ‘What?! That’s crazy. You’re not brave.’My face fell.‘It’s true. You work in the arts. You’re 37. And you have a serious boyfriend. In what way are you brave?’After being initially crestfallen, I realized she was right. I can only rock my silver hair because I live in a rare bubble that allows me to. Could you imagine a woman running for president with grey hair? I want to say yes, but currently I believe the answer is no. But I think by women embracing their grey, we can start to change the conversation. I’m hopeful that women in the near future will be able to wear their hair grey, pink, brown, or whatever they choose!”

Image credits: grombre

#68

“All about my own natural balance. In the mirror, I started feeling doubt of my coloured hair. My face was naturally ageing but my hair was clinging to some artificial youth. However I repeated retouching roots. I knew I wanted to stop colouring sooner or later, but one reason stopped me to change the course. I was scared to look older.Last Spring I saw someone close to me taken up to the sky before reaching the age of 50. Instantly my perspectives had shifted, I am not afraid of ageing. Suddenly the reasons to repeat colouring my hair disappeared. It’s clearly to see two choices in the hair salon ‘repeat or evolve’. I chose to evolve.Now one year has gone, I have started loving my natural self. One simple act that stopped me fighting nature, stop altering myself made me to embrace my age. Before this transition, I was thinking my appearance was fading but now I feel it is softening that makes my natural hair with silver sparkles become well balanced.In the mirror, I see honesty. I am on the way to a better version of myself. This year I become the age that my mother was forever. My mindset is better placed to stepping into this special phase in my life and beyond.My grombre journey is all about well-being, helping me develop a positive attitude towards natural ageing deep inside and sparkling grey hair encourages me to increase my confidence. This grombre journey has become a doorway to my evolution inside and out.”

Image credits: grombre

#69

“My daughter inspired me to stop coloring my hair as she is allowing her grey hair shine through. I have actually never seen my grey and I must admit, I was nervous about what it would look like. I LOVE my natural color! If only I had known how great it would look I never would have colored it! I love the support my daughter gave me to go grey”

Image credits: grombre

#70

“I am almost 8 months in of being dye free.. and let me just say, it’s been a little terrifying, yet very liberating, to watch my signature dark brown hair fade away and witnessing the new silver making its way in for good! Learning to embrace it to the fullest… and the support from my silver sisters definitely helps:)”

Image credits: grombre

#71

“I realized that how covered up my gray hair was was starting to define who I had become and how I viewed myself. The more my TRUE roots were peeking out, the less I felt I had my sh*t together. Even more, the bigger story I was telling myself was that other people didn’t think I had my sh*t together!Have you ever felt that way? Like, how others thought about your appearance was an indicator of how good you looked and how good you felt about yourself?It sounds ridiculous, but somehow, we have been conditioned to think, by some notion set by some unknown standard, that unless we have our grays covered up, we are not caring enough about ourselves.And the crazier thing is that this is not the perception society has with men! When a man starts going salt and peppery, he’s seen as sexy and established. But, when a woman starts showing her grays, there’s a stigma attached to it like there is something wrong with her life. She’s seen as haggard, unkempt, stressed, in distress, problemed, careless, out of control, out of touch…I mean the list of negative thoughts could go on and on!But that’s not how I felt or was! I was none of those things!So at that point, I decided I would stop consuming myself with how much and where the gray was starting to peek out, when my next appointment would be scheduled, and what other people thought my hair reflected about me and what’s going on in my life.”

Image credits: grombre

#72

“I’ve always known I’d go grey relatively young. I found my first silver strand at age 13. They never bothered me much until my wedding at age 30; I couldn’t stand the thought all of a sudden of looking ‘old’ on my big day so I dyed them all away. That led to years of struggling to cover stubborn roots every three weeks – from salon appointments, to at-home root touch up kits, coloured hair spray, and waxy crayons. So I decided to go cold turkey and ditch the dye. But with about 3 inches of growth at the roots coming in, I was also facing another challenge: Infertility. Well, if walking into a fertility clinic for IVF and being told you’re approaching advanced maternal age makes you feel insecure, try doing it with a sea of patchy, awkward salt and pepper growth. I had some low moments where I questioned both paths. But as my silvers slowly took over, I felt a new confidence emerging – even as we decided to end fertility treatments after years of unsuccessful procedures. A surprise natural pregnancy almost coincided with the full growth of all my greys. This maternity shoot, to me, celebrated both of these difficult journeys. I’ve never felt more comfortable, beautiful and at peace in my own skin than in that moment.”

Image credits: grombre

#73

“24 weeks into my grey journey Can you see the tiredness in my eyes? A long time ago I realised that my eyes give away pretty much everything A realisation like that at a young age served to make me a particularly honest person. Not because I stood on some moral high ground, but because I simply couldn’t lie very well . Over time, the honesty became habitual and comfortable (thankfully) and I realised it was actually a very simple way to live ?But the thought of dishonesty was SO uncomfortable, that whenever people complimented my jet black hair, I’d find myself spluttering and babbling explanations about it being dyed and not really mine etc etc. I’m REALLY looking forward to now just being able to say ‘thank you’ when someone says they like the colour of my grey hair. What a joy it will be to be liberated of this burden I put on myself ”

Image credits: grombre

#74

“Say hello to my ‘Skunk Patch’. That’s what I call my gray patch if hair. My first handful of strands appeared when I was in high school and I would try my best to hide them. In college, more appeared and people would point them out, call me ‘old’, tell me I need to dye my hair, tell me that I’m too young to have gray hair, etc. I was so embarrassed!

I was watching tv one day and noticed there were a few celebrities that dyed their hair gray. ‘Wait… this is a thing now?! Gray hair is popular?!’

I immediately thought about my thick eyebrows ‘thickums/Caterpillars’. (Everything has a nickname ) I used to get made fun of because they were so thick and it used to bother me until I realized many of the people that were making fun of me were also using make up to fill in their eyebrows. They’re taking extra steps to take what I have, so how bad can when I have actually be?? The same thing for the people that were dying their hair. They’re dying their hair to get a look at that some of us have naturally, so why are we ashamed of it?

Our gray hair doesn’t define our youth. I learned to accept me for how I am—skunk patch, thickums, and all. ”

Image credits: grombre

#75

“Today someone asked me:

‘Does your hair just do that?’

‘Um, yes, it does just ‘’do this.’’

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#76

“I last dyed my hair one year ago today. At the time I thought ‘Ok, it’ll only be about a year of being awkward and embarrassing, I can do it.’ What this year has taught me (besides how grossly I overestimated my hair growth) is that it’s not awkward and embarrassing at all. I know I get weird looks and I’m sure people think I’m silly for doing it. But I truly don’t care. And the best part is that that confidence is spilling over to other parts of my life. I’m still carrying 10 extra pounds and my clothes don’t fit right. Time to buy new stuff! Why yes, that IS my child shrieking in the middle of the grocery store, have a wonderful day. Is that food on my shirt? Yup. Finally being comfortable with myself and realizing what is actually important. All because of hair.”

Image credits: grombre

#77

“My growth is finally complete! I found out that after years of trying to get a certain shade, it was there all along! Provided by mother nature! Will never bleach again.”

Image credits: grombre

#78

“When I was 12 I dyed my hair from my natural light brown to blue black as a way to rebel and have been playing with colors on my hair ever since. When I started looking in the mirror and thinking: oh, time to make an appointment – you can see the gray, I realized I was done. The rebel in me now is rebelling against the beauty standard saying women have to remain impossibly young to be attractive while men with gray are distinguished and handsome. It wasn’t easy or instantaneous though – seeing all the gorgeous women going #grombre empowered me immensely. Now I can only hope women who see me feel like it is okay to opt out of the double-standard-beauty-hustle if they want too. Also, the color play doesn’t have to end here – as you can see, I am not against throwing in a wash of temporary purple for fun at times too!”

Image credits: grombre

#79

“I found my first grey when I was 11 and I’ve spent the last 16 years dying it. I cut my hair very short this time last year and decided on a whim to embrace having natural hair for the first time in years. I love how it’s made me more open to embracing all elements of who I am. That and the confused looks on people’s faces who can’t figure out my age! I can’t wait until I’m fully silver. “

Image credits: grombre

#80

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#81

“I am 33 and just started a job as an Assistant Professor of Anthropology. I took this selfie the morning of my first big lecture class. My distinguished gray gives me authority in the classroom, but whenever I go home to Texas, my thoughtful mom tries to get me to dye my hair, so I’ll be more attractive to prospective mates…I sometimes worry about aging and looks, but the last time she got me hair dye, I exchanged it for lipstick. I love how my incoming gray hairs are coarse and kinky; I take them as a sign of unruliness in my years of age to come.Oh and I’m wearing my mom’s vintage Liz Claiborne power suit, and that’s my wild office plant Medusa in the background.”

Image credits: grombre

#82

“It’s part of my culture that only spinsters or grandmas stop coloring their hair. God forbid anyone younger than 60 show your gray! So true to the pressure I spent years box coloring, highlighting, getting ombré, balayage all the things to mask the gray. I can’t even begin to calculate how much I’ve spent on covering and hiding what I’d always been ashamed of. Then one month I missed an appointment for my root cover up and couldn’t get it to coordinate with my busy work schedule. No amount of styling could hide what was happening. One day I had a customer compliment me on the “sparkle” that was happening around my forehead and temples. Embarrassed I tried to tuck it behind my ear, but the way she kept complimenting me and telling me to be proud of what was happening just sparked something inside me. Why was I trying to hide what was given to me by nature. So that night I googled all I could, checked Pinterest for how to transition to gray and found this HUGE community that was starting to rise on Instagram. I wasn’t alone and I’ve never felt so relieved! All these beautiful women going thru the same thing I was, the struggle with the looks, the questions from family and friends. It gave me even more strength to keep going gray. So here I am almost one year dye free, purposely trying to style my hair so that the most silver parts show (because let’s face it, those are the prettiest parts) and I’m never going back.”

Image credits: grombre

#83

“15 months into this journey and in one quick cut my transition could be complete! ??‍? But where’s the fun in that?! I love my long hair and I’m in it for the long haul. I didn’t start this journey by choice, but I’ve chosen to continue it. It’s definitely a conversation starter, which isn’t always a benefit. There are still days when I struggle – am I too young for this?? But, this is me.?”

Image credits: grombre

#84

“I found my first grey hair at age 15 and decided to pull it out because who really wants to feel ‘old’ at 15. More sprung up but thankfully in the middle of my head and I became the master of hiding them. As soon as I was given permission to dye my hair at 17, I did. I’ve had pretty much every ‘natural’ looking color in the book from jet black to blonde. My mom is one of 10 kids, six of which are women. Three of them have never dyed their hair and embraced their beautifully grey and silver tresses. I decided to follow their lead. The last time I dyed my hair was March 9, 2018 and I haven’t looked back. In spite of being called ma’am (I don’t live in the south) or called old by my kids, I still feel great and am proud of my grey streaks.”

Image credits: grombre

#85

“Well, they are here, and they are coming in hot. You know, those well meant suggestions to just chop it all off… queries as to whether I’m ‘old enough’ to do this yet… an actual: oh wow aren’t you brave from a consultant at a dress shop.If I own that I think it is beautiful they don’t know how to respond. People are much more comfortable with comedy… I called this my year to be princess glitter skunk and that made it easier… like people can relax knowing I know it looks different. When do we outgrow that habit to make others comfortable with us? I’m hoping this is my season because I feel much more beautiful and comfortable and confident privately. My husband sees it. My kids see it. Most importantly, I see it.”

Image credits: grombre

#86

“A few years ago, I thought I would go back to my ‘natural’ brown hair color. I had been highlighting my hair for years and it had gotten too light. Then 2 weeks in to having dark brown hair, I began to see bright gray coming through. I was shocked. I realized that the dark hair wasn’t me anymore. But the blond highlights weren’t either. This realization made me want to embrace whatever I was seeing… to embrace me. Then I asked my husband what he thought, about me letting my gray hair grow, and he said ‘It’s not about the color, it’s about the woman.’ YES! So, 18 months ago I stopped coloring my hair. About 6 months in, I decided to cut my hair. Now I’m working on growing it back out. I have just a few blonde ends remaining but other than that I’m almost fully transitioned to my natural color. This has been an amazing journey. Letting go of what I thought my hair color should be, has helped me learn to let go of other expectations of myself and others. It has been freeing. Which is perfect, because my intention this year has been ‘freedom’. Freedom to let go, freedom to be me.”

Image credits: grombre

#87

“What is beauty anyway? Beauty is whatever I feel the best in on any given day. If I feel like letting my hair be an untamable lions mane , or a slicked back ponytail in all its assertive glory , I am beauty.When I was 5 I was a huge Madonna fan, boots, tulle skirts, bracelets and microphone in hand I would tell my mom I couldn’t wait to grow up and go gray so I could dye my hair blonde and be like Madonna . My 5 year old mind already knew somehow the difficulty of stripping my dark hair into bleach blonde . Fast forward to age 23 when my hair first started to turn into slivers of silver and I knew what was coming. Today, I swap between a blonde hue to a grombre. As long as my favorite shade of lipstick is available I can let these grays take center stage.”

Image credits: grombre

#88

“My Sparkles came in early. I detected the first threads of non-brown in my twenties. Ever since then I made a point of keeping up with my root touch-ups.I fought them hard, these silvery sparkles, thinking that I just can not be myself. I associated grey hair with old, aging and not beautiful…or so I was told for most of my life growing up. The influence of the fashion industry I worked in, my parents, friends, society kept instilling the big No-No in me.Now, journeying back to the root of why I disliked my sparkles so much, I understand that it’s epically amazing to age, to get wiser, to show of all the sparkles that speak of my beautiful journey as a mama, a healer and all around modern woman. And most of all to give my daughter permission to age with grace. As she she calls them: Mommy’s sparkles: ‘Find your sparkles, love them hard’”

Image credits: grombre

#89

“I was born with a shiny gray patch at a young age and from the time I could remember it was always told to me that it was my birth mark. I would get asked all the time by kids why did I have old people hair in one spot of my head and I would tell them it’s not old people hair and that God gave me special powers. In high school however a strange hair moment happen end of 8th grade it began to turn black which freaked my parents out cause apparently that was unheard of. I definitely became a Debbie downer about it because it made me feel like I was no longer unique. Little did I know on my 16th Birthday that it would yet again debut itself, yep grey spot at the front center of my head. Only one person in my family prior to me has had gray from early on and that’s my Great Grandfather. It is something that we share in common as I’m the 1st great grandchild and the only girl. I had inherited his gene. I wear it like a crown and my as my sacred place for confidence and peace. To me its a badge of honor, its natural and it makes feel beautiful. Hiding it has never been an option. I was told that having gray hair was a sign of wisdom. Today many men and women write me and thank me for ‘being brave enough’ to rock my gray and thank me for pushing them to do the same. This is my signature look . I’ve heard many rude comments about my gray at such a young age but I’ve her twice as many compliments on my hair from both men and women. And I’m always asked if I dyed my hair to look like it does. I always laugh and say ‘absolutely not, I was born with this. ?’”

Image credits: grombre

#90

“I live in an off-grid cabin during the summer months, and dying my roots every two weeks became almost impossible. This past summer however, I decided enough is enough, and took the opportunity to stop dying my hair once and for all. It’s been 8 months now, and while it wasn’t easy in the beginning, and I had a lot of doubts, I quickly embraced it and never looked back. I LOVE my natural silver color and can’t wait for it to grow out completely, but I am also really enjoying the 2-tone grow out process, as well as the looks that I get (good, bad, and puzzled). I feel empowered and free to be me, and I hope that I can inspire other women to consider going grey/silver too (once they are ready). There is a definite sisterhood and a knowing-look when us ‘silver sisters’ pass each other on the street. There is strength, honesty, and freedom in this process. 8 months down…another 12+ to go..!”

Image credits: grombre

#91

“Two years ago my transformation began where I really got tired of the slavery of every 20 days dyeing my hair, when I started here in Colombia being “pretty” is a tremendous social pressure I gained a lot of weight, but I had mental surgery where I would not take into account the destructive comments and where I was going to lose weight, today I can say that although I received comments from my relatives that my husband was going to leave me because of my gray hair, which seemed old. Etc.. I have lost 17 pounds and I love my gray hair, I feel better than ever and I think that impacts others, do not give up and make yourself beautiful for you, because you are worth. A big hug from Colombia.”

Image credits: grombre

#92

“My grays started showing at age 35. White roots didn’t go well with Asian black hair. It required dyeing my hair every 3 weeks, at the least. I planned on going gray at age 60. But my husband’s near-death event in October, 2015 changed my perspective. As I cared for him while he recovered from a massive heart attack and a stroke, I asked myself how could I even worry about getting my hair colored while he struggled to regain his strength and energy?Once I decided to go gray, I was determined to get it done as fast as possible. In December, 2015, I got an uber-short pixie, shaved back and all. I have to wear suits for my job, and going to court rocking a reverse ombre took a lot of courage. People would literally do a second look and then they would stare for a long time at my hair. But then as the months went by, the stares changed to ‘I love your hair’, ‘What shade of color do you use, I’d like to get it, too’. Some would even come up to me and ask if they could touch my hair.It took 9 months to get rid of the color. It’s been 4 years since that first pixie/shaved hair. My hair feels soft and silky now. I still get comments that ‘You need to or you must color your hair, you’re too young to have gray hair’. But I note that they’re coming from people who are coloring their hair. And to them I say – No, thank you. I am okay with my grays and my wrinkles and my sun spots. Life is too short to worry about growing old. This is me and I am happy being me.”

Image credits: grombre

#93

“I first started seeing grey hair when I was 15 years old. Dyeing it seemed the logical thing to do until 2012 when I had two mini strokes in a 4 month period. My neurologist said ‘your decision.’ I went back and forth with dyeing, going natural and relaxing my hair until the end of 2017. Natural and grey now at 61. Wearing grey wigs, braids and dreadlocks too while enjoying the second half of my journey.”

Image credits: grombre

#94

“I feel like I am where I’m supposed to be, looking like how I should: new night driving glasses and bigger chunks of gray. Not my ideal, or preferred, but I like how my gray streaks has grown in. Not having colored my hair since my college days, there was no way I’d start now. Some days I love it more than others but feeling more me, more authentically me, each passing day, I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

Image credits: grombre

#95

“Cela faisait 15 ans que je me colorais les cheveux. Les femmes de ma famille ont eu les cheveux gris très tôt et moi encore plus tôt que les autres. J’avais honte plus jeune de voir mes cheveux vieillir, et être la seule parmi mes amies. Pendant le confinement, j’ai décidé d’arrêter les colorations et de laisser mes cheveux au naturel. Aujourd’hui, je fête mes 5 mois sans artifices et je me sens libérée d’un poids. J’ai pris confiance en moi, je n’ai plus honte d’afficher ma blancheur au regard des autres, les hommes que j’ai rencontré ont même trouvé ça joli et original.Je suis plus forte aujourd’hui qu’avant.Ma petite fille de 3 ans va pouvoir avoir un modèle de femme qui s’assume telle qu’elle est et elle pourra être fière de sa beauté naturelle et celle de chaque personne sur cette planète.Je suis fière de moi et de toutes les femmes qui prennent le courage de passer le cap pour finalement être ce qu’elles sont !Bravo les filles !!!” @artegoliving

Image credits: grombre

#96

“The last few years I’ve been trying to get back to myself, to recognize my own reflection, to stop folding myself up to fit into what other people expect from me.Two years ago, I was burning out in many areas of my life. In the midst of transition, change and recovery, I stopped dyeing my hair. I started by normalizing grey hair through grombre. I wanted to see what other women’s natural hair looked like. These online women became my heroes and my inspiration. They were brave and real and embracing who they were. Here, I found gorgeous, stylish women in all seasons of their lives. And when I got tired of how my hair looked as the color grew out, I came back to these photos, shoring up my courage to keep going. @mightywithin said, ‘People say to me all the time, “if mine looked like yours I’d do it.” How will you know until you try?’ That was a tipping point for me. I kept coming back to her photo and telling myself ‘How will I know until I try?’ Being in between two things is hard, the liminal space between two shores can be torturous. Some might say ‘it’s just hair,’ or ‘you’re not even that grey,’ but I am becoming a truer version of myself. Where I allow myself to exist as I am.”

Image credits: grombre

#97

“My family was invited to a wedding back in 2012; I was married, had two kids and was 40. There was no way I was going with streaks of grey, so I had my hair dyed at a salon. It was a good thing I had gone in two weeks prior to the wedding, because when I went to wash my hair for the first time I ended up having an allergic reaction to the residual dye. One of my eyes nearly swelled shut as well as my cheek, the back of my neck and my scalp felt like it was burning, it took a week for things to clear up. Since then, I’ve said goodbye to the dye and am never looking back!”

Image credits: grombre

#98

“I started to read @glennondoyle ‘s book about her journey to her true self and it all collided. While embracing the grey is simply a vanity issue, it felt more than that. I have always made an effort to look good, dress well, stay fit and I like makeup and clothes. All of these things contribute to my wellbeing. If I looked good, I felt good. It’s intertwined. As a result, this journey has been tough. It took a few weeks to be able to look at myself in the mirror and like what I saw. I cringed a lot and worried too much about how I would be perceived by others. Was I going to disappear into the abyss of an ‘older invisible woman’? Would the end be what I hoped it would be – a mane of glorious white locks? I knew I had to ‘rock the grey look’ but didn’t really believe it. I am now on week 12 and HERE. I. AM. I am embracing the greys and by extension, I am embracing myself. I know this will be a long journey but its mine. See you on the other side!”

Image credits: grombre

#99

“I’m a 33yo Brazilian woman that lives in the Czech Republic.I have gray hair since I was 13. I started dying my hair because of pressure from family and friends. But I did it by my own terms! I’ve had red, orange, green, blue and purple hair.About 5 years ago, I moved to the CZ with my husband and just got too lazy to keep dying my hair all the time and decided to embrace it!Now I absolutely love my gray afro!”

Image credits: grombre

#100

“I started my silver journey several years ago. My husband and I were having a casual conversation about women with grey hair… He said he wasn’t a fan ? Of course that was the day I committed to letting my hair grow out! Haha! I started going grey when I was sixteen! So it was time to stop dumping all those chemicals on my head. My hair has never been this healthy! And the husband came around and now LOVES IT! I wish I would have done it sooner. No regrets!”

Image credits: grombre

#101

“I am tired…. tired of feeling self conscious and afraid! I have tried and failed several times when it came to growing out my greys. Everyone’s words weighed heavily on my decision to not complete the process. I’d hear ‘you are 37 not 50!’ Or ‘you’re to young to start looking old.’ Why does grey have to define our age?! It doesn’t!! Our current -pandemic- situation has helped motivate me to keep going. To keep my greys growing! Looking at all these beautiful grey haired women of all ages keeps me motivated. It’s a battle with myself but it is getting easier and easier. Can’t wait to see the end result.”

Image credits: grombre

#102

“My decision is a combination of embracing my natural self, giving my body a break from chemicals for health reasons and a bit of a need of a transformation. I relaxed and colored my hair for YEARS. Lots of different colors but never my own. I didn’t even embrace my natural color (dark brown) until I stopped relaxing about 15 years ago. Once I did, I loved it but I was still coloring to maintain it. I was already greying pretty good at the time since I started greying at 22.I took inventory and realized how many years I had been absorbing chemicals through my scalp. It’s a serious transaction that had become so second nature to me. I was maintaining my status quo for convenience. Everything you do to your body should be considered carefully. I had been thinking about this more from a skin and digestive perspective but that includes my hair too!I started to do more research on healthy color alternatives and was prepping to apply a henna treatment. I glanced in the mirror and said, ‘let’s just stop’. I wonder what I really look like. Just me. No mask, no color. I want to fall in love with the natural me. I haven’t seen her in YEARS. Especially since I never embraced my hair entirely as a child. I also realized I still held outdated notions about grey hair and age and beauty. Notions that I know are wrong. I was accepting that beauty in others but not in myself. Going grombre is growth for me. I wanna walk it like I talk it. This is honestly therapeutic. There are still days when I look in the mirror and think, ‘girl. what are you doing.’ But there are more days when I am excited. I get an updated look every couple of months and it’s happening naturally. I am so looking forward to the changes to come.”

Image credits: grombre

#103

“Four years ago this February I lost my father, a brilliant, complicated, tender-hearted man who loved my sister and me with his whole being, all of his faults and strengths included. Perhaps it was his mid-western heart; though a California transplant for more than 55 of his 83 years, the biggest piece of who he was could be traced back to the farmhouse surrounded by cornfields he grew up on in Iowa, and the deep significance of family he learned there. I never knew my dad as anyone other than a handsome, silver-haired man. By the time I was old enough to have end-of-day conversations with him at the table in our backyard, there were only varying degrees of dark gray and silver on his head and in his beard. So when this February arrived, and my 55th birthday was just around the corner, as well as a world-changing pandemic, it seemed the moment had arrived to take a breath, surrender, and see what would come. I have moved through the world this half century+ fair-skinned, light-eyed and dark-haired. The idea of losing my connection to that person – no longer being her – felt terrifying. It is with great delight that I share here ten weeks of silver to show off – yes silver, just like my father’s! The authenticity I feel in embracing this next chapter is both exhilarating and liberating! I am beginning to look different, but I feel more me than ever. As a single parent and full-time artist – both daunting paths at times – I thought I had learned how to be my toughest, truest self. It turns out there is another layer to uncover, and more to learn.When my dad (whose name was Owen) was in the hospital, his watch was tangled up in the IV lines and no one had taken the time to remove it. I brought it home and it has been hanging on a jar of his old cologne in my bedroom for four years. EVERY SINGLE TIME my sister walks through my door within just a few minutes the alarm on his watch starts beeping. He’s still here ❤.”

Image credits: grombre

#104

“I have always been a hat and beanie kind of girl, never one to love my hair. On my birthday, this year, I decided to fulfill a bucket list item of shaving my head. I remember my husband’s words clearly, ‘Look at all of the silver and white you have,’ as he helped me buzz off years of henna dyed hair. My heart began pounding and I was literally shaking, as the fear of looking old overwhelmed me. I had every intention of dying my hair back. I began reflecting on all of the hours spent monthly on home dying my hair. I thought about what my family and friends would think of me, not only now buzzed, but very gray. I then turned to the internet and found the beautiful community of grombre. I needed those stories and strong female faces to help me feel comforted and normal. Once I started talking about going gray more with husband and family, I realized that no one really cared about the color of my hair. What is important is keeping your head up and smiling through this life – and that is what I hope to inspire others to do”

Image credits: grombre

#105

“This is a time for self reflection. A time to rid oneself of all that is unnecessary. I cannot wait for my hair transformation. I started going silver at 18. For years I hid with dyes. I did not want to accept looking older at such a young age. During quarantine I was forced to go natural and began falling in love with my silvers. Now, I can wait for a silver afro.“

Image credits: grombre

#106

“I have been dye free since January 2018. Before that I had made it to 1 year (3 times!) but an event would come up or that time I was 8 months pregnant, and I would feel deeply insecure and unsure and would long to ‘feel like myself’ again. Even though the same lessons with getting sober 5 yrs ago helped with the transition, sayings like ‘one day at a time’ and ‘trust the process’… growing out grey hair is complicated cause it’s both an internal and external transition and you’re having to show the world both at once without being able to catch up or hit pause. In December of last year my father passed away from a very aggressive 5 month battle with brain cancer. It was devastating….it still is. My silvers hold a different meaning now. I look at the them and no longer thing of aging. I see them as a reminder and symbol that I can endure really hard things and that I can walk through the unknown even if I feel like I don’t know how. I look in the mirror and I feel a tenderness toward my silver strands, I see my story unfolding… one that is both heartbreaking and beautiful.”

Image credits: grombre

#107

“I was grey before it was cool I found my first grey hair when I was in middle school. I knew it was inevitable because my dad was fully grey by 30. I stopped dying my hair completely about 3.5 years ago when my friend/stylist @nyokagregorybeauty advised me that I was at the point where if I didn’t stop dyeing my hair; I would be fighting a brown tint at some point. A few months ago I cut off all the relaxed ends and got a silk press. This all me baby! Although it is kept in protective styles 98% of the time, I’m still proud of my greys even at 35 “

Image credits: grombre

#108

“We’re in semi-lockdown here in Singapore and I’ve been working from home since late March. So since we’re all advised to stay home til June 1, I figured why not?I think this is the shortest my hair has ever been, I’ve always had a bob haircut, but I am loving the freedom that comes with it! (not to mention how much I save on haircare in terms of usage)My 10 year old son thinks it’s cool, and I am so glad that I’ve had no one ask about it in during recent job interview video calls. Maybe it was just me being overly self-conscious all along!”

Image credits: grombre

#109

“I’m allergic to all dye (natural and toxic). I work in a professional setting. I do what I want. This Sunday will be 20 weeks into my grey hair transition. I haven’t dyed my hair since December 1, 2019.”

Image credits: grombre

#110

“The emotions of covid, they’re like nausea— they come in waves”, my mom explained over the phone last night. I’ve been meditating on those words ever since, because how accurate is that analogy?! One minute things are fine, and the next, BAM, not so much. Sudden emotional constipation takes over: fear, doubt, and anxiety swell up with nowhere to go. And just like nausea, the smallest things are helping to get through it. For instance, those moments just before…you know… ?, it helps to focus on the cool tiles on the bathroom floor to counteract that overwhelming hot clamminess that comes with being sick. Likewise, I’ve found that popping a cold, cold grape in my mouth has become a cherished antidote to a moment poisoned by fear. Something about that cold grape reminds me of goodness. Also, who knew laying in a $26 hammock tied beneath the trees would bring such peace, joy, and security (documented above). Maybe I subconsciously think I’m “getting away” from it all by taking my feet off the earth… but floating in glittering green leaves, my *favorite* color, definitely helps. You gotta find those moments where things are just… ‘right’ again, even for a moment, and hold onto them. It’s part of how I’m navigating my “nausea”— with new and deep gratitude for the little things. I’m making my gratitude list and it’s growing everyday. What little things are helping you through moments of anxiety?

Image credits: grombre

#111

“I was too young to be gray, I was to self conscience, I would look too old and I worried too much about what other people thought. These were the doubts and fears that kept me coloring my hair every 3 weeks. But in actuality, I loved seeing women with their natural grey hair, they inspired me and I dreamed of the courage to take that step. For 3 years I negotiated within myself, weighing every positive and negative that would come from setting my roots free until I was tired of thinking and decided to act. I wanted all women to feel comfortable in their own skin, their own hair, and why not me too. Hair doesn’t define who we are. Silver, grey, white, ash, are all beautiful colors and I’m learning to celebrate mine.”

Image credits: grombre

#112

“When I woke up this morning, I knew something had to change. I was pissed at the world. Pissed at the news. Pissed…… that I got furloughed…. that my husband got a pay-cut…. that my kids are not getting an education…. that they can’t see their friends…. that I can’t see my friends…. at all the heartache in the world…. that humans can’t be together…. pissed that my cousin passed away from COVID-19 yesterday.Fact is, I’ve been growing my grey out for the past 3 months with the intention of dealing with and documenting the roots and the journey. I thought I would have this long, amazing, liberating story to share with @grombre. But then I woke up this morning, and said “screw this”. If I can’t change any of the above, I can change my hair. I feel better now.”

Image credits: grombre

#113

“For sometime I was hoping to have an opportunity to get myself cleaned up for a lovely selfie to send. But before I had the chance, the world made other plans for me. I’ve realized how comforting the transition to grey has made me feel during these crazy times. In moments of worry and fear I touch my grey and am reminded to trust my experience. This too shall pass and I’ll have more beautiful grey to show for it.”

Image credits: grombre

#114

“Growing up I naturally had dirty blonde hair, but then at the young age of 20 I spotted my first silver. I was disgusted at the sight and plucked it out. I was always striving to be this blonde bombshell with perfect highlights to cover the many random silver strands. After years of covering and fighting with my hair dresser about the tones of blonde, I realized I wanted a tone I already owned genetically. Today I no longer have any processed bleached strands. The silver is coming through as natural highlights and most can’t even tell. I can though. ??‍? My confidence is much higher knowing that I can be just as beautiful without bleaching and having to spend hundreds of dollars on my hair. I anticipate after this quarantine a lot of women thinking about throwing away the box! Don’t question it! Just do it. ? I’m working as a funeral director and mortician during this weird time and making a hair appointment is not on my list of things to do when it’s over! PS. Stay home and go grey!”

Image credits: grombre

#115

“As an Asian Australian, born and bred in Melbourne, the ideal beauty like much of the Western world, was girls with blonde hair and blue eyes.My journey into modelling began with my hair dyed red in my teens, followed by shades of purple, blonde and variations of brown for shows and photographic shoots. Upon taking up modelling full time in London, I finally returned to my natural shade, black. Little did anyone know, I had been greying for many years before this. I was often booked for jobs as the token ‘asian model’ and although a part of me had finally embraced the natural me – dark hair with asian features, the truth was I was still covering my greys. I was still conforming to society’s obsession with youthfulness and eliminating all signs of ageing.Since March 2020, COVID and lockdown allowed me the opportunity for my hair to ‘do its own thing’. I now feel confident enough to fully reclaim the ‘real me’ and more than that, bring attention to our current beauty standards, which is hurting girls and shaming women, adding unrealistic pressure on all of us that age.I’m lucky to have found a supportive stylist at @joeyscandizzosalon and appreciate their honesty, professionalism and progressiveness. Not everyone’s cool with it, but that’s okay. I think I’m about half way through my greying journey and I can’t wait to see the real me that will be black, white, grey and true!”

Image credits: grombre

#116

“2020 was a tough year, and it didn’t go well with my mental health. That’s why, I decided to eliminate things that worry me too much, and I realized that the attempts to hide my greys gave me a lot of anxiety. This includes: hating the process of dying hair, panicking over stained bathroom floor, and worrying if the hair dye will give me cancer… to name a few. But for years, I colored my hair anyway. I was scared of how others perceive me, because grey hair means old, and old means ugly. So much time, energy, and money wasted into hiding my true color, and it’s all done in the name of insecurity.I was faced with two options: hide my grey and deal with the anxiety, or let it grow and deal with how the society judge me. Either way, I can’t win, and I don’t like that. Then it hit me. The answer was there all along. The first option was a scared act of hiding, and the second was a permission to let the my true color shine. And that’s when I realized that my worth has nothing to do with my body or hair color. I can still be a good person with grey hair. Heck, I can still be fierce and beautiful with grey hair!With that, I stopped coloring my hair a few months ago. And when the grey part had grown long enough, I chopped off the remaining dyed part (which is a plus, because I’ve been wanting to revisit pixie haircut). I see this process as a step towards self-acceptance. As a way to show that I love my body, every inch, every single silver strand.”

Image credits: grombre

#117

“About 3 years ago I developed issues with severe weakness of my arms and legs, pain, & balance problems to name a few. I saw a lot of doctors and had so many tests including brain scans to rule out MS and other brain and spine issues, blood tests to rule out things like autoimmune disorders, even had unneeded surgery that didn’t help at all, until I finally found a doctor that diagnosed me correctly. Come to find out I had heavy metal toxicity – very high levels of lead, mercury, and gadolinium (which is found in MRI contrast mediums). Most people have levels of these metals and don’t develop problems but my body responded badly.  I was a dentist for several decades, drilling out my patients’ old silver fillings every day so all of this made sense. I was told to do a full detox, not use anything that has a lot of chemicals including certain  lotions etc, AND recommended to stop using hair color. I hadn’t even thought about growing out my gray, as I’ve been coloring for quite a long time.  I really wanted to do whatever I could to try to feel better, so I stopped coloring cold turkey. I was pretty depressed. I could barely use my arms, I couldn’t play my beloved bass guitar, and now my hair was half gray and half brown with highlights. Really not a good time in my life. But then I found your page and all of the inspirational stories, so I stayed with it. 3 years later I’m actually really happy with my gray. I get a lot more compliments on my hair than I ever did when it was colored. And it is so freeing not to color. I’m almost 57 years old and my authentic self. My arms and legs have not fully recovered – there is permanent damage – but I got some resolution and at least I can somewhat function. I had to step down from my band as I cannot put the time in needed to practice my bass, and I can’t practice dentistry anymore but I found a great job as a dental consultant. I’ve come to terms with everything, it was quite a journey, but I love my gray hair and will never go back.”

Image credits: grombre

#118

“I’m currently 24. I found my first gray when I was 11, but my mom recently told me SHE found my first gray hair when I was 8! I have been growing out my greys since February 2020. I’m destined to be a silver sister, so why fight it?I had been dyeing my hair monthly (either myself or at the salon) since I was around 17. I always toyed with the idea of growing out my natural hair someday because I noticed I had a pretty serious streak at my crown. Whenever my roots were starting to peek out, I would point my white patch out to my friends or coworkers and ask, ‘Do you think I should grow out my white streak?’ Most of the time the answer was something to the tune of ‘Yeah, go for it!’ but there were a few people (mostly older women) who said I was ‘far too young to go grey.’ I thought that was strange. Because regardless of whether I hid them or not, I was in my early 20s going grey anyway.I got more serious about ditching the dye when I saw how healthy my mom’s hair was when she decided to embrace her natural snow white hair a few years ago. When March 2020 rolled around, it quickly became obvious that the timing was right. After a few months I bleached the dyed ends of my front streak (poorly lol) and eagerly waited for my silvers to fill in. I’ll reach one year of growth in February, right before my 25th birthday! ?The online community I’ve since discovered of women going gorgeously gray has helped a lot whenever I hit an awkward stage of the growout. There are so many beautiful, radiant, and supportive silver sisters from all over the world! I think it’s super positive for me to have role models who are real and ageing gracefully, and I feel so lucky that I will get the opportunity to watch my pattern change and develop over time. I hope that I can help prove to people that you can’t be ‘too young’ to go grey.”

Image credits: grombre

#119

“I stopped dying my hair in February 2019 and I’ve been waiting patiently until my hair has grown out long enough to truly show itself in a photo. I’ve always associated grey hair with negative terms — being old, being frumpy, giving up. I dyed my greys for years, trying to fight back time by appearing ‘younger’ and ‘better’ with darker hair. The thought that I could love myself, grey hair and all, or that I could embrace myself and my sexuality as a 51 year old woman, with grey hair, seemed unattainable. Many people close to me, including my husband and some of my dearest friends, commended my continual dying and agreed that I looked ‘better’ with dark hair and that I should wait until I’m much older to ditch the dye. I almost followed their path. Until, and seriously, one of those friends directed me to this Instagram site. I instantly found support and courage through all the posts of women my age, women older than me, and those much younger, who’ve decided to let go of their need or desire to cover or change their aging appearance. I’m feeling comfortable and empowered as I let go of the need to try to look a certain way, and instead, accept my changing as a reflection of my growing wisdom. I’m loving these silver strands. And I know that I can love and have compassion for all those around me only if I first have love and compassion for myself. Thank you @grombre and all of you for supporting me on this journey. And I hope this post encourages more of us to do the same.”

Image credits: grombre

#120

“When I touch my hair, I always think about my mother. She and I have exactly the same hair. She was about my age when she passed away in my motherland, Japan. Growing up, I’d dislike my hair: thick, coarse, frizzy, and wavy. And then I started to have gray in my early 20’s. Exactly the same as my mother did… I vividly remember about my mom’s last haircut – it was done by me, teenager self. She was too ill to go to a hairdresser. When I close my eyes while brushing my hair, I can always feel her hair. When I see my gray, I see her last days… When my young child touches my hair, I always hope that he would sense his never-seen grandmother through his delicate fingers. As I decided to ditch the dye, I was just so tired of this repetitive and seemingly endless process of touching ups. When I let go, I reconnected with my mother… It was so unexpected and miraculous. Growing out my gray hair was not something easy for me to transition into. It took me several years to let go of societal norms: pressure to be someone else. I re-started my IG account to dedicate my silver journey just to record my transition. Without knowing, I created my handle name using my mom’s name and birthday. Was this meant to be? Was it a sign? I have had no clue how this self-discovery has unveiled even during this short period of time. I would not call it “self-acceptance,” more of astonishing liberation and reunification of true self. I absolutely love my hair and colors now, which show magnificent personality and powerful manifestation of my beloved person (who is still so close to my heart!), after the past quarter century of yearning.When you stop fighting, Mother Nature takes care of you with a splash of color silver.”

Image credits: grombre

#121

“4 months 122 days… what kind of crazy, beautiful, amazing things can you accomplish by the end of the year?I woke up and danced this morning to no music. I moved around my room in the dark in the quiet and just flowed…I knew in my gut that today was going to be special. I will be cleansing my house with my new copal ( which I will be sharing later), I have plans to have lunch with a girlfriend not to mention my hair is looking fabulous!! And I am continuing to work on my new series…La Buena Limpia!The last 6 months have weighed heavy and continue to do so for so many reasons. I know many of you feel the same. But that doesnt mean we can’t chose to find something that can help us through these times that will light us up!Maybe start a new bookTake a new classLearn a new languageTurn your hobby into a businessGet 5 new clientsSell out your inventoryLose 10pdsIncorporate new recipes Go a day without wanting to run away from your children…lolThere are 4 months left in the year!!! What do you want to accomplish in that time and how can I support you!EMBRACE YOUR OWN KIND OF BEAUTIFUL”

Image credits: grombre

#122

“I’m rebelling.I’m letting my hair be its natural colour, or color, whichever spelling you prefer! Why??? There’s LOADS of it! I’m bored of going to get my colour (I’m used to this spelling now) done every 3 weeks, and I’d prefer to put the money to other things. I wasn’t sure I’d like it. Being faced with the grey brought typical thoughts of ‘I’m old, I haven’t accomplished what I thought I would, time is flying by, and that’s that then.’ I’m not really sure what the THAT is, but whatever.BUT, I do love it. LOTS! It’s liberating!! I’ve gained more time not getting my hair done, I’ve saved money, I’m curating a wardrobe that is ‘me’ which definitely includes growing up in New York and being influenced by the 1970’s. (thanks Mrs. America and the ERA for reminding me!) And, most importantly, all those thoughts aren’t true. Ok, yes, obviously getting older happens, and time does seem to fly by, but it seems acceptance of your grey hair means you accept yourself, for me anyway. It means… I have realised my accomplishments, I surround myself with real joy, and hope to bring things that are meaningful/valuable to others. Another and… I think I’m quite big on ‘feel the fear’ and do it anyway.”

Image credits: grombre

#123

“I noticed grays in my late teens but didn’t think much of it at the time. Fast forward to my early thirties. Two children later and a plethora of gray sprouting up all over the place! I admittedly in my attempts to ‘not look old’ would dye it, but the color would never keep more than a week or two. I simply don’t have the patience for that kind of upkeep so I decided to just let nature take its course. I do find myself occasionally wavering between whether or not to color or cut it, but in the end I opt against it. My husband refuses to let me dye it because he’s never seen me without the gray lol. I also receive numerous compliments on the color. I’m learning slowly to accept that I’m not supposed to look like I did 20 years ago, as I am also not the same person I was 20 years ago. My gray is a part of who I am. All my joys and sorrows of the past 47 years.”

Image credits: grombre

#124

“My mom didn’t dye her white hair and chose to go natural
— though cost and time was likely a factor as she had a full time job as a nurse’s aide and five kids to support. As a teen I really wanted her to dye her hair. I didn’t want her to be different. I witnessed how some women treated my mom like she was old— when oftentimes she was younger, stronger, fitter, smarter— and had been blessed with a beautiful complexion as well as a kind heart. When my mom reached her fifties — she said she felt happier and more confident with herself and with her life. Ironically, when I tried going naturally gray in my early 50s — mom wanted me to dye my hair again. I think it was hard to see her adult daughter aging and she didn’t want me to deal with negative comments from other women. A couple years before she died she told me the sad story that many women friends that were in their 70s & 80s told her they were ‘afraid’ to grow out their hair because they’d look ‘old.’ My mom died two years ago and though I am now 56— I’m still not sure she’d like me going natural— but here goes Mom 🙂 Thankfully, my own 16 year old daughter is much more supportive than I was as a teen and likes my silver-gray. The last time I tried going natural — I cut off all my hair to about an inch or two from the scalp — then a few months later I highlighted (mistake: my hair went yellow even with purple shampoo). This time I layered my hair which so far is working better as I do not have the features to pull off a drastic pixie. Fingers crossed as I finally grow out my hair to reveal my true hair color. Patience is key.”

Image credits: grombre

#125

“I vividly remember finding my first grey hair in the car on the way to school. My 14 year old self was mortified so of course my gut reaction was to pull it out. ‘Oh, you shouldn’t pull them out, they’ll grow back tenfold’ (did anyone else get told that?!). There began the start of my life as a slave to hair dye (I’ve got the damage to prove it!). I was dying it religiously every 6 weeks, going through cycles of using box dye then regretting it and forking out at a salon. Until lockdown began. In April 2020 it dawned on me how many years I have left ahead of me in that constant cycle of dying my locks, just trying to delay the inevitable…! So here marks probably the midway point of my Grombre journey. It has been nearly 11 months since I last coloured my hair, and I actually think my greys add a little bit of something special Bring it on!!”

Image credits: grombre

#126

“Around sixth grade, I started dyeing my hair just to fit in and to be accepted by my peers. Growing up, my self-esteem depleted because I’m not like any other kids who are ‘normal’. I got teased a lot when I was in grade school, calling me ‘lola’ (granny), ‘tanda’ (elderly), and some asked me if they can pull my gray hair to get rid of it so I can be like them, ‘normal’ for which I sadly obliged.
My gray hair became more visible when I was in college. My roots have gone gray and since then, I’m getting a lot of questions and judgments about my hair. Like, ‘When did you start having gray/white hair?’, ‘Why don’t you dye your hair black cause it’s better’, ‘Oh Ella, the girl with ‘uban’ (gray hair), and I felt more insecure at that time. So, I dyed my hair every month just to ‘fit in’ and to gain more self-esteem.
One year ago, I decided to stop dyeing my hair. I wanted to let my hair and scalp be free from all the chemicals and to let myself be free from all the insecurities and the stress that comes to it. I started to accept my flaws and be more comfortable with it. Even now, in my workplace and in my everyday commute, I’m still getting that judge-y/curious look while they are looking at my hair. But, instead of feeling insecure, sad or mad, I just tell them right away that it’s hereditary and just smiled at them knowing that I’m no longer affected by their comments about my hair. In addition to that, I’ll never have to pay a substantial amount of money to salons to dye my hair gray or silver to be deemed ‘cool’ or ‘trendsetter’ because now, who would’ve thought that I have always been this ‘cool’.
I’ve never felt so great being different now that I feel more confident about my insecurities. I feel so empowered and knowing that there is a community like @grombre , I got to know a lot of people who are brave, amazing, and supportive to others who has the same dilemma.”

Image credits: grombre

#127

Verified
“Like my father and brother, I had silvery strands of hair emerging in my 20s. It was nothing major though, and an occasional trip to the salon disguised them nicely. Then, at age 36, I gave birth to my fourth son and became very sick. I blamed my mix of symptoms on being an exhausted mama to so many kiddos under age 7, but then my hair started falling out… and what remained was turning grey seemingly overnight.

After 10 months of misdiagnoses, I was finally properly diagnosed with an autoimmune disorder – one with a myriad of symptoms including ‘rapid premature greying’. Like many people with autoimmune diseases, most could not tell how sick I was, and I didn’t want them to know. I made more frequent trips to the salon, determined not to look ‘like an old lady before I was even forty’.

Then one day shortly after my 39th birthday, I proudly returned from the salon with a full head of newly-colored hair and asked my husband, ‘How does it look?’ He asked permission to speak freely and gently explained my hair looked so unhealthy – almost plastic – and it didn’t flatter me at all. He reassured me, ‘I will always support you doing whatever you need to do to feel beautiful and confident, but would you ever consider just letting it go grey?’

I considered his suggestion for a long time before deciding he was right; my hair looked terrible – and extremely fake. More than that, my motivation to cover those greys was about denying my disease — and WHY was I ashamed of something that happened TO me and was well beyond my control?

I began the 18 month journey to grow out my greys and celebrated achieving remission from my autoimmune disorder along the way. Now, when people ask, ‘Who colors your hair that beautiful shade of silver?’ I respond boldly, ‘It’s all natural! Achieved through years of raising four sons and battling an autoimmune disease’. The universal response? ‘Well good for you! It’s stunning’.

Image credits: grombre



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